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Science 

Federal Report Calls For $275 Million To Stop Asian Carp

Enlarge this image Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill., in June. John Flesher/AP hide caption toggle caption John Flesher/AP The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has proposed spending $275 million to upgrade defenses against an invading force. The enemy? A fish. Specifically, Asian carp that are threatening to break through to the Great Lakes. In June, a live Asian silver carp was caught in the Illinois Waterway just 9 miles from Lake Michigan. Scientists fear that if…

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Science 

Coddled Puppies Make Poor Guide Dogs, Study Suggests

Enlarge this image New research found a link between how puppies interact with their mothers and how they perform in guide dog training. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Westend61/Getty Images Well-trained guide dogs are important for visually impaired people who rely on them. But many puppies bred to be guide dogs flunk out of training programs. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the way a puppy’s mother raises it may be the key to the dog’s success, or failure. A research…

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Science 

Scientists Prepare For ‘The Most Beautiful Thing You Can See In The Sky’

Enlarge this image Montana State University Eclipse Ballooning Project team members (from left) Garrett Hilton, Katherine Lee, Berk Knighton and Micaela Moreni prepare to launch a high-altitude balloon during a test flight on June 22 near Rexburg, Idaho. During the Aug. 21 solar eclipse, teams across the nation will live-stream video footage of the eclipse as part of the MSU-led project. Kelly Gorham/Montana State University hide caption toggle caption Kelly Gorham/Montana State University You might think that, after thousands of years of observing total solar eclipses, science-minded folks would have…

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Science 

Can Buddhist Practices Help Us Overcome The Biological Pull Of Dissatisfaction?

Enlarge this image “There’s a kind of a bridge between cognitive therapy and Buddhist practice in evolutionary psychology,” says author Robert Wright. Veronica Grech/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Veronica Grech/Getty Images Are human beings hard-wired to be perpetually dissatisfied? Author Robert Wright, who teaches about the interface of evolutionary biology and religion, thinks so. Wright points out that evolution rewards people for seeking out pleasure rather than pain, which helps ensure that human beings are frequently unsatisfied: “We are condemned to always want things to be a little different,…

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Science 

What Bloodied This Teen’s Feet? Tiny Marine Flesh Eaters Had Scientists Stumped

The attack took all of half an hour. That’s about how long Sam Kanizay says he spent relaxing waist-deep in the waters of Melbourne, Australia’s Brighton Beach on Saturday. The 16-year-old had been footsore from a round of soccer, he says, and the cold water felt pleasant as he absently listened to songs on his iPhone. It was only when he finally waded out of the water that he discovered what had happened to him: Blood streamed from thousands of tiny pinpricks that littered his legs from the ankle down….

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Recipes 

Fresh Salmon Cakes with Spicy Mayo

My mother loved to mix canned salmon with a few seasonings and shape it into cakes headed for a hot skillet. This meal thrilled us as kids and it was an easy cooking night for her. Now I make salmon cakes with fresh cooked salmon, which only adds a few minutes to the prep time and makes incredibly moist cakes. This is also a great way to use up leftover salmon from another meal! Continue reading “Fresh Salmon Cakes with Spicy Mayo” » … Read the referenced recipe here: Fresh Salmon Cakes with Spicy Mayo

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