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Republicans’ Proposed Medicaid Cuts Would Hit Rural Patients Hard

Enlarge this image Pemiscot Memorial, the public hospital in Missouri’s poorest county, depends on Medicaid funding to survive, its CEO says. Bram Sable-Smith/Side Effects Public Media hide caption toggle caption Bram Sable-Smith/Side Effects Public Media For the hundreds of rural U.S. hospitals struggling to stay in business, health policy decisions made in Washington, D.C., this summer could make survival a lot tougher. Since 2010, at least 79 rural hospitals have closed across the country, and nearly 700 more are at risk of closing. These hospitals serve a largely older, poorer…

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Survivors Of Childhood Diseases Struggle To Find Care As Adults

Enlarge this image As a child, Rachael Goldring had multiple open-heart surgeries to treat her congenital heart disease. At 24, she still sees pediatricians because she’s had difficulty finding the right care in adult medicine. Kerry Klein/KVPR hide caption toggle caption Kerry Klein/KVPR Rachael Goldring was born with congenital heart disease. Had she been born a few decades earlier, she probably would have died as a baby. Goldring is now 24, and among a population of patients who present new challenges to a health care system unaccustomed to dealing with…

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Dramatic Increase In Number Of People Being Hospitalized Due To Opioids

NPR’s Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. Traci Green, deputy director of injury prevention at Boston Medical Center about the stunning show increase in the number of hospital visits related to opioids. … Read the referenced story here: Dramatic Increase In Number Of People Being Hospitalized Due To Opioids

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A Pioneer In ‘Flat-Fee Primary Care’ Had To Close Its Clinics. What Went Wrong?

Enlarge this image In theory, the result should be better health for patients and lower health care costs overall. But some analysts say the “direct primary care” approach just encourages the worried well to get more care than they need. BraunS /Getty Images hide caption toggle caption BraunS /Getty Images In recent years, a small but growing number of medical practices embraced a buffet approach to primary care, offering patients unlimited services for a modest flat fee – say, $50 to $150 per month — instead of billing them a…

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She May Be The Most Unstoppable Scientist In The World

Enlarge this image “In college, I would tell my friends that I wanted to pursue a Ph.D., and they would chuckle and ridicule the idea,” says Eqbal Dauqan, who is an assistant professor at the University Kebangsaan Malaysia at age 36. Born and raised in Yemen, Dauqan credits her “naughty” spirit for her success in a male-dominated culture. Sanjit Das/for NPR hide caption toggle caption Sanjit Das/for NPR Two years ago, Eqbal Dauqan was going to work in the morning as usual. She’s a biochemistry professor. And was driving on…

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How Your Sandwich Changed The World

[embedded content] NPR’s Skunk Bear YouTube What if you could go back in time and follow your food from the farm to your plate? What if you could see each step of your meal’s journey – every ingredient that went into its creation, and every footprint it left behind? Back in February, The Salt reported on English researchers who did just that: they rigorously investigated the origin of a single loaf of bread, from wheat field to supermarket. Their report is full of incredible detail. How big a field would…

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Study Finds Yoga Can Help Back Pain, But Keep It Gentle, With These Poses

New research finds that a yoga class designed specifically for back pain can be as effective as physical therapy in relieving pain. The yoga protocol includes gentle poses and avoids more difficult ones. Comstock Images hide caption toggle caption Comstock Images If you’re tired of popping pain medicine for your lower back pain, yoga may be a good alternative. New research finds that a yoga class designed specifically for back pain can be as safe and effective as physical therapy in easing pain. The yoga protocol was developed by researchers…

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When Is It “Terrorism”? How The Media Covers Attacks By Muslim Perpetrators

Enlarge this image Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images President Trump has often accused the news media of not covering terrorist attacks adequately. In a speech in February he said, “Radical Islamic terrorists are determined to strike our homeland as they did on 9/11, as they did from Boston to…

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