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1979 Klan-Nazi attack survivor hopes for a ‘justice river’

AP Photo/Allen G. Breed GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) — The Rev. Nelson Johnson needs no reminders of the massacre of five of his labor-activist friends almost 40 years ago – he still has the faded scar on his left arm, left by a Nazi who stabbed him as white supremacists descended on a march for workers through black neighborhoods in Greensboro. But the violence surrounding the Aug. 12 march by Ku Klux Klansmen and Nazis in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the death of a young woman … Read the referenced story here: 1979…

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South Korea: Trump Promises Not to Attack North Without South’s Consent

South Korean President Moon Jae-in Thursday said he has received assurances from U.S. President Donald Trump that Washington would not launch any attack against North Korea without Seoul’s approval. “The United States and President Trump have declared and promised that whatever military action they would like to take, they will fully discuss it with us and get our consent,” Moon said. The South Korean president held a press conference in Seoul to mark the first 100 days of his administration. The liberal Moon was elected to office in May following…

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Charlottesville Attack: Facebook, Reddit, Google And GoDaddy Shut Down Hate Groups

Following the Charlottesville attack which highlighted the surge of violence among the white nationalist groups in America, tech companies are looking at the ramifications of letting hate groups use their platform and services. After Go-Daddy de-registered domain of the racist site the Daily Stormer and gaming chat app Discord shut down the accounts associated with the attack, social networking sites Facebook and Reddit have started targeting hate groups. Both companies confirmed to CNET on Tuesday they would ban groups that violate their hate speech policies. The Charlottesville attack received widespread condemnation,…

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[In Depth] Test blasts simulate a nuclear attack on a port

At a time when a nuclear bomb smuggled by terrorists is as big a concern as one from a foreign power, delivered by missile or airplane, an attack at a port is likely scenario. But nuclear forensic specialists, who rely largely on nuclear test data collected years ago in western deserts, lack a clear picture of how energy from a detonation would propagate in the highly saturated geology of many U.S. port cities. To remedy that, the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency last October quietly staged Humming Terrapin: a 2-week…

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