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Video Games May Affect The Brain Differently, Depending On What You Play

Enlarge this image mustafahacalaki/Getty Images People who played action video games that involve first-person shooters, such as Call of Duty and Medal of Honor, experienced shrinkage in a brain region called the hippocampus, according to a study published Tuesday in Molecular Psychiatry. That part of the brain is associated with spatial navigation, stress regulation and memory. Playing Super Mario games, in which the noble plumber strives to rescue a princess, had the opposite effect on the hippocampus, causing growth in it. Scientists have done dozens of studies looking to see…

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Sharpen Your Brain and Fall Asleep Faster With a Before-Bed Brain Dump

With access to different information platforms like Google, Facebook, News channels, families and even your own perspectives walking down the street, your mind becomes cluttered. Your brain is busier than ever before as an information-processing system.[1] As you sit down to work in front of your computer, you may find yourself too overwhelmed to focus. Your head is stuck and you are mentally paralyzed. An office worker could be trying to finish his project but gets distracted by customer emails. A mom of two kids could be wondering how she…

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Secrets of the Creative Brain

There are countless books and movies about individuals whose skills seemed to be naturally given. This has created a misconception that creativity is simply something you have, or do not have. A recent book Great Minds and How to Grow Them has shown that there is often no such thing as a born genius or born creative.[1] In fact, much like a muscle, creativity and inventiveness can be developed. It can even be taught. All it takes is practice, and exercising those creative muscles that have often been unused and…

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How Clutter Drains Your Brain (and What You Can Do About It)

You’re sitting on the subway or bus, trying to read something. It could be related to a work project or it could even be for pleasure. A person comes and sits down next to you. They’re in the middle of a loud personal conversation about their friend’s romantic antics. Now, instead of focusing on your reading, you find yourself hearing parts about someone’s love life — and, in fact, you have to consciously focus on ignoring that conversation to get your own reading done. Most people think it’s easy to…

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Why It’s Difficult to Be Creative: An Underdeveloped Right Brain

Most of the works in the society are driven by the left-brain, which does best with linear and logical thought processes. Think about the academic settings, everything from class content to assessments of languages, maths and sciences are designed to work in a logical manner. When it comes to work, most jobs involve tasks that are procedural work and most forms of fact-checking. The performance of all these tasks executed by the left-brain are easily quantified. This has set the left-brain for better training than the right-brain. The power of the…

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You’ve Been Using Your Brain Wrong: Human Brains Aren’t Designed to Remember Things

If you think that the secret to effective brainpower is to stuff it with as much information as possible using your memory, think again. Look at these. This is what will appear in your mind when I ask you to recall the night view in the city. When it comes to memory, our brains are typically no better than an 8GB USB storage device. In the modern world, information bombards us constantly. And if we rely on our 8GB capacity to memorize as much as possible, the only way to…

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Alzheimer's may be linked to defective brain cells spreading disease

Science Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s may be linked to defective brain cells disposing toxic proteins that make neighboring cells sick, say researchers. These findings could have major implications for neurological disease in humans and possibly be the way that disease can spread in the brain. Alzheimer’s may be linked to defective brain cells spreading disease

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