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Science 

Simulating The Bodily Pain Of Future Climate Change

Enlarge this image Pedestrians walk on a flooded street on Sept. 11 as tropical storm Irma hits Charleston, S.C. Mic Smith/AP hide caption toggle caption Mic Smith/AP Lisa Feldman Barrett is a professor of psychology at Northeastern University and the author of How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain. You can keep up with Lisa on Twitter: @LFeldmanBarrett. Close your eyes and imagine a beautiful spring day in the forest. In your mind’s eye, try to see tall, green trees and smell the aroma of blooming flowers….

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Finance News 

Amazon just made a huge change to its $12 billion cloud computing juggernaut (AMZN, GOOG, GOOGL, MSFT)

When Amazon launched Amazon Web Services in 2006, it sparked a cloud computing revolution.  No longer would programmers have to buy, build, and maintain their own servers. Now, developers could pay Amazon by the hour to access exactly the amount of supercomputing power they needed. It totally changed the economics of building software, making it possible for a new breed of companies like Dropbox, Airbnb, and others to exist.  Now, Amazon is changing the game again, in a subtle but important way. Amazon EC2 — the prime computing engine at the core…

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Tax Cuts for Small Business Would Change GOP Trajectory

Newt Gingrich, FOX NewsTime is running out for Republicans if they want to keep their governing majority in 2018. After 238 days of having control of the White House and both houses of Congress, the GOP has only one major legislative achievement – the Senate confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch. … Read the referenced┬ástory here: Tax Cuts for Small Business Would Change GOP Trajectory

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Science 

Coffee, Bees and Climate Change Are Linked In Ways You May Not Have Expected

Enlarge this image A coffee farmer picks fresh coffee cherries in Colombia. New climate research suggests Latin America faces major declines in coffee-growing regions, as well as bees, which help coffee to grow. Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont hide caption toggle caption Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont Pollinators such as bees play a key part of producing the beans that go into your morning cup of coffee. In fact, they are responsible for about 20 to 25 percent of coffee production by increasing the plants’ yield, Taylor Ricketts,…

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