You are here
Science 

Simulating The Bodily Pain Of Future Climate Change

Enlarge this image Pedestrians walk on a flooded street on Sept. 11 as tropical storm Irma hits Charleston, S.C. Mic Smith/AP hide caption toggle caption Mic Smith/AP Lisa Feldman Barrett is a professor of psychology at Northeastern University and the author of How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain. You can keep up with Lisa on Twitter: @LFeldmanBarrett. Close your eyes and imagine a beautiful spring day in the forest. In your mind’s eye, try to see tall, green trees and smell the aroma of blooming flowers….

Read More

Trump’s First Day at UN Focuses on Reform, Iran, Climate Change

U.S. President Donald Trump launched into a whirlwind round of bilateral and multilateral discussions Monday at the beginning of his four-day diplomatic marathon in New York for the annual United Nations General Assembly debate, and many meetings on its sidelines. In his first U.N appearance Monday morning, a day before the General Assembly session formally opens, Trump presided over a session on reforming the world body and called for bold action to make the 193-member organization “a greater force for peace.” Flanked by U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and Washington’s U.N….

Read More
Science 

U.S. Still Out of Paris Climate Agreement After Conflicting Reports

The White House has reaffirmed its position on the Paris Climate Agreement despite reports that the United States would stay. “There has been no change in the United States’ position on the Paris agreement. As the President has made abundantly clear, the United States is withdrawing unless we can re-enter on terms that are more favorable to our country,” the White House said in a statement Saturday. Our position on the Paris agreement has not changed. @POTUS has been clear, US withdrawing unless we get pro-America terms. — Sarah Sanders…

Read More
Science 

Coffee, Bees and Climate Change Are Linked In Ways You May Not Have Expected

Enlarge this image A coffee farmer picks fresh coffee cherries in Colombia. New climate research suggests Latin America faces major declines in coffee-growing regions, as well as bees, which help coffee to grow. Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont hide caption toggle caption Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont Pollinators such as bees play a key part of producing the beans that go into your morning cup of coffee. In fact, they are responsible for about 20 to 25 percent of coffee production by increasing the plants’ yield, Taylor Ricketts,…

Read More