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How to Fight Back the Human Instinct to Flee When You Panic

In 2003, Aron Ralston went hiking alone in southeastern Utah. An experienced outdoorsman, the trail didn’t seem to present any danger for him. Things were going well until he slipped, dislodged an 800-lb. boulder, and was pinned to the canyon wall by it. With limited supplies and no way to call for help, he realized that the only way he’d leave the canyon alive was if he amputated his arm. Using a dull multi-tool and leverage, he managed to free himself after five days.[1] Aron could have lost his wits and…

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[Report] Late Pleistocene archaic human crania from Xuchang, China

Two early Late Pleistocene (~105,000- to 125,000-year-old) crania from Lingjing, Xuchang, China, exhibit a morphological mosaic with differences from and similarities to their western contemporaries. They share pan–Old World trends in encephalization and in supraorbital, neurocranial vault, and nuchal gracilization. They reflect eastern Eurasian ancestry in having low, sagittally flat, and inferiorly broad neurocrania. They share occipital (suprainiac and nuchal torus) and temporal labyrinthine (semicircular canal) morphology with the Neandertals. This morphological combination reflects Pleistocene human evolutionary patterns in general biology, as well as both regional continuity and interregional population…

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[Business Office Feature] Webinar | A high-resolution look at the human cell: Introducing the Human Cell Atlas

Resolving the spatial distribution of the human proteome at a subcellular level greatly increases our understanding of human biology and disease. A high-resolution map of the human cell has been generated—part of the Human Protein Atlas database—that provides the in situ localization of 12,036 human proteins at a single-cell level, covering 30 subcellular structures, and enabling 14 major organelle proteomes to be defined. The high spatial resolution of the data has allowed the identification of novel protein components in all major organelles, as well as the characterization of fine cellular…

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X-ray to study micronutrients in human minibrains

Science It is consensus that mothers’ diet has critical effects on fetal development, and the absence of nutrients is related to impairments on brain formation. In order to characterize the nutrients during human brain development, Brazilian scientists investigated human minibrains using synchrotron radiation, a sort of X-ray. Results showed that concentration and distribution of chemical elements are related to the stage of development and similar to previous data obtained from postmortem brain samples. X-ray to study micronutrients in human minibrains

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